EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN, MR HO KWON PING

A PRODUCTIVE APPROACH TO TRANSFORMING INDUSTRIES

The Straits Times, 5 April 2016
In a commentary, Mr Ho Kwon Ping shared his views on the $4.5 billion Industry Transformation Programme, announced in the 2016 Budget. He argued that government attempts to increase economic productivity must move beyond broad initiatives such as the Productivity and Innovation Credit scheme which any enterprise can take advantage of, to highly targeted measures appropriate to the different needs of each industry sector. To boost productivity in construction, Mr Ho raised the idea of having a Housing Development Board subsidiary buying and leasing labour-saving equipment to smaller companies. He also pointed out that government-linked companies can create a system to partner selected small and medium-sized enterprises to go overseas, whether it be in logistics or consultancies, retail shops or other kinds of service or product providers.

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IPS-NATHAN LECTURE SERIES

Mr Ho Kwon Ping, the first Institute of Policy Studies S R Nathan Fellow for the Study of Singapore, delivered five much-discussed lectures on Singapore: The Next 50 Years. Read his speeches below:
Lecture I: Politics and Governance (20 October 2014)
Lecture II: Economy and Business (12 November 2014)
Lecture III: Security and Sustainability (5 February 2015)
Lecture IV: Demography and Family (4 March 2015)
Lecture V: Society and Identity (9 April 2015)

 

COMPLETING THE WAGE REVOLUTION

The Straits Times, 17 January 2012
At the Institute of Policy Studies’ annual conference themed, “Singapore Perspectives 2102 – Singapore Inclusive: Bridging Divides” held on 16 January 16 2012, SMU chairman Ho Kwon Ping sees the need to complete the wage revolution that was started in the 1980s in order to close the widening income gap. He discerns that Singapore has a dual-income economy: an internationally competitive and well-paid economy, and a low cost, low-skilled domestic economy. To bring about a more equal and self-reliant society, he urges that wages in the domestic service industries should be raised. 
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INNOVATION - THE WAY HO KWON PING SEES IT

The Business Times, 24 October 2011
Mr Ho shares that it is critical even for companies in non- high-tech industries to embark on innovation with a recognition that it is strategic to their own future.
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BANYAN TREE'S HO KWON PING: "HIGH FLYERS"

Bloomberg Television's, 12 September 2011
Ho Kwon Ping, founder and executive chairman of luxury resort operator Banyan Tree Holdings Ltd., talks about his life, career and business philosophy. Ho spoke in Singapore with Haslinda Amin on Bloomberg Television's "High Flyers." Read more

 

PROCESS TOO POLITICALLY CHARGED?

The Straits Times, 26 August 2011
Ho Kwon Ping, chairman of the board of trustees of SMU, writes that the future of Singapore politics is of vital concern to every Singaporean, but the battle for the minds of the electorate properly belongs in the realm of parliamentary elections. Read more

 

SOFT POWERS OF A PRESIDENT

The Straits Times, 7 July 2011
Mr Ho Kwon Ping, Chairman of the SMU Board of Trustees, wrote in a commentary that while an elected president may have only custodial powers and ceremonial responsibilities, he may bear the burden of articulating the voice of the nation at its proudest, and rallying its people at the most dire of times.
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TOWARDS A FIRST RATE ELECTORATE

The Straits Times, 5 May 2011
Ho Kwon Ping, chairman of the board of trustees, writes in this commentary that Singapore may be moving deliberately yet irrevocably towards a First World electorate, and that if all goes well, the winner in this watershed election may well be Singapore's future.
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THE SILENT REVOLUTION IN MY BACKYARD

The Straits Times, 19 January 2011
When Mr Ho went to South America for two weeks recently, he went in search of the legacy of guerilla leader Che Guevara and to assess his answers to economic underdevelopment and inequality. He found no successful revolution there – only idealistic but botched movements and some measure of progress and hope for the future. On reflection, it is in fact in his own backyard, the island of Singapore, that the most significant socio-economic revolution has taken place. The answers to much of the Third World's malaise can be found in Singapore's own ascent from Third to First World. The challenge for Singapore then, is how to not drown in its own success. Singapore's biggest success, he said, has been the creation of a middle class society, but one which must not ever lose its edge, its slight paranoia and its unease at its own success.
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Last updated on 18 Jan 2017.